Hotspur History Timeline, 1836...
Crawford River, S-W Victoria, Australia

Crawford River at Hotspur looking west to the iron bridge, opened 1870 Hotspur developed as a small settlement on the banks of the Smoky or Crawford River in south western Victoria in the 1840s. As with many of these early townships it developed near a creek or river crossing which provided a major obstacle for early travellers with their heavy bullock drawn drays and wagons and consequently they camped on the banks and soon one or more inns were constructed to cater for the constant stream of early travellers.

Hotspur, like Digby was on one of the main north - south wagon routes linking Portland Bay to the early pastoral runs of the interior and a settlement was established close to this difficult river crossing point.

Map showing the location of Hotspur, south of Digby on the Crawford or Smoky River

This small collection of events is an attempt to list some of the early happenings in the Hotspur district in the 1800s.

Additional material, stories, images of early Hotspur and its surrounds is welcome.





Daryl Povey

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Hotspur Timeline

1836 - Crawford River: "Rises North of Branxholme and flows south-west by Hotspur, Co. of Normanby; named in 1836 by Major Mitchell after a military colleague, Major_General Sir Alexander C. Craufurd of Newark Castle, Ayrshire, Scotland." Source: "Place Names in Victoria" - Les Blake.

1837 - The HENTY brothers sent the first flock of sheep north from Portland Bay to Muntham Pastoral Run. This was the beginning of the settlement of inland south western Victoria. They would probably have crossed the Crawford River, perhaps where the settlement of Hotspur was established over the next few years at this significant crossing point on a low, boggy river flat.

1842 - The first building in the township of Hotspur was the Crawford Inn which was opened by Daniel O'NEILL in about 1841. Proir to coming to Hotspur he was storekeeper in Melbourne. On April 18th, 1843 the police bench at the Grange granted him a certificate for the renewal of his licence.

1842 - John CAREY 1804-1866, b. Guernsey, son of John CAREY & Judith MAINGAY, died Geelong, Vic.; squatter of Smoky River 1842-1844.

1842, Mar 15 - Donald McKENZIE a squatter, and his hut keeper Frederick EDINGE were killed by aborigines not far from Hotspur.

1843 - The first public sale of livestock in the Portland district was held at the Crawford Inn on June 8th, 1843. Henry HAYDEN a Portland Auctioneer conducted the sale in which cows realised an average of 7 pounds 17/6 a head, and bullocks sold at 17 pounds 10 shillings a pair.

1843, Aug 31 - Christopher BASSETT, squatter of "Bassetts" or "Crawford Station" at the head of the Crawford River near Hotspur was killed by aborigines.

1843 - Henry MONRO, son of Professor Alexander MONRO of Edinburgh University took over "Bassetts" or "Crawford" Station on the Crawford River at Hotspur. Henry MONRO held "Bassets" from 1843-1849 and "Crawford" Station from 1858-1862. He died at Malaga in Spain in 1869. One of his sons became General Sir Charles Carmichael MONRO 1860-1929, who took over from Sir Ian HAMILTON as officer in charge of the Dardenelles campaign, overseeing the successful withdrawal of Australian troops from Gallipoli in December 1915.

1845 - Hector McDONALD and Kenneth McKENZIE had occupied "Snizort" Pastoral Run.

1846 - Ann O'NEILL wife of Daniel O'NEILL of 'The Crawford Inn' at Hotspur died on 23 Jun 1846, aged 42 at 'The Crawford Inn' and was buried at Hotspur 3 days later.

1847 - Hector McDONALD from "Snizort" Pastoral Run took over the licence for the "Crawford Inn".

1848 - James HAMILTON recalled as a ten year old from Ozenkadnook Station north of Casterton taking a dray load of wool through Digby and Hotspur to Portland.

..... From Digby we made the Smoky River next day. This was our worst crossing - the black mud and slush running along way out at each side of the channel. On getting through, we camped at the township, now called Hotspur. It was much in appearance like the other townships I have described. The public house was kept by Hector McDONALD, who afterwards shifted to Portland, and built the place well-known as Mac's Hotel. Our next stage brought us to Heywood.....

1848, Jan - Application dated 15 Dec 1847, received from Hector McDONALD for a licence to operate the "Crawford Inn". "The Argus"

1849, Nov. - Daniel KELLY married Mary BASTABLE of the "Crawford Inn" at the residence of Hector McDONALD, Hotspur, Victoria. Hector McDONALD owned the "Crawford Inn" at this time so that may be the location of the wedding.

1852 - Thomas BRINDLEY and family from Derbyshire arrived at Portland on the "Emma Eugenia" and settled at Hotspur near the Crawford River.

1852/3 - William KEY, blacksmith, and family from Tetney in Lincolnshire arrived at Portland on the "Anne Milne" and settled at Hotspur.

1854 - John McCONACHY took over the licence for the Crawford Inn.

1855, Jan - James HISCOCK and his wife Jane COBB from Somerset arrived on the "Shand" at Portland and settled near Hotspur.

1855, Jan - John SYPOTT from Cheshire, England and Mary O'LEARY from Cork, Ireland married at Digby and settled at Hotspur.

1856 - The Roads Board accepted a tender from Bailey & Cook for the construction of a bridge at Hotspur over the Crawford River.

1856 - Edwin HISCOCK and his wife Elizabeth TERRY from Somerset arrived at Portland on the "Arabian" and settled at Hotspur.

1856, May - Land Sales at Portland. A sale of Crown lands is announced in yesterday's Government Gazette to take place at Portland on the 6th proximo The lots on the first day consist of 3 suburban at Digby, on the River Stokes, about forty-four miles from Portland, towards the Wanon ; 4 country, at Tarragal ; 2 at Trewalla; and 88 at Hotspur, about thirty-eight miles from Portland, on the Crawford River road from Portland towards the Wannon.

1857 - A visit to Hotspur by James BONWICK on his horseback ride through western Victoria.

HOTSPUR upon the Crawford, or Smoky River, eighteen miles from Heywood, and thirty-eight from Portland, is another of the four years old towns. A rude bridge and an hotel had existed from very primitive times. A new bridge is now being constructed, in the place of the other washed down by the flood. A large flat stretches for some distance on both sides of the river, and is a perfect gluepot to pass in winter; my horse trembled in his passage through, and the rider confesses to some nervousness, as he had just been regaled with divers stories of mud smotherings and river drownings. The present bridge is to prevent further accidents, and is made three hundred and fifty yards long by five yards wide. A party of sober and intelligent Canadians had the contract, and were to receive 7 a yard for the work.

Here again I met with the sad story of no Sunday Service since the very formation of the settlement. When journeying through the place, and observing no school, I promised to return in a few days with a clergyman to establish one. Having to organise the school by myself, through inability to procure the aid of the minister, I noticed the distress of one man at our little meeting. Inquiring into the cause, I received this explanation, delivered with much feeling. 'Why, do you see Sir,' said he, 'my wife and I wanted our children christened. For five years and more we have been hoping to get a parson to drop in here to give us a sermon. Now when I tell my wife you have not got the gentleman you promised to bring, she'll break her heart about it.'

Two things are painfully apparent to the thoughtful traveller in the Bush, the want of the appliances of religion, as well as the almost utter indifference of the people to its claims, where means are at hand. As men are the creatures of habit, there will be sad consequences following the neglect of the habit of attending places of worship. One man acknowledged to me that for twelve years he had never been situated within many miles of any opportunity of joining in Public Worship. Township after township in the interior have I passed through, where, in answer to my usual enquiry about such matters, it was said,-'Oh no, we never had any preaching here.' Children of advanced age are as ignorant of the first principles of religion as savages, or as even many of their own parents.

Hotspur is chiefly peopled by carriers. Distance from medical assistance reduces ladies to the necessity of aiding each other. I was informed that hardly any of the grown population could read. Twelve houses form the township. The half acre allotments were bought by speculators in Portland at from 20 to 50 each. A bit of decent land extends for a mile, when the desolate forest and gravel come again. The limestone breaks out near the river, about two miles down. A yellow variety has some rich looking crystals, and many fossils. The valley of the Smoky river exhibits denudations on a large scale. Large masses of the ironstone conglomerate, or solidified gravel, are found on the surface of the plateau land. Quartz was reported to me to be on the Major's Track, about ten miles to the south-east.

NOTE:- Hotspur, on the Crawford River, is the centre of an agricultural pastoral and timber getting district. Smoky Creek was the original name of the Crawford River. The first building in the township of Hotspur was the Crawford Inn which was opened by David O'NEILL in about 1842. The first public sale of livestock in the Portland district was held at this inn in June 1843.

Rising Sun Hotel, Hotspur

1858 - A publican's licence was issued to John McCONACHY for the new Rising Sun Hotel.

1858 - Angus McEACHERN was the Inn Keeper at the "Crawford Inn", Hotsur from 1858-1861.

1860 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 25 Apr 1860, John McCONACHY of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Rising Sun Hotel at Hotspur. Surities were - Duncan McCALLUM of Ardgarton, Digby and John STOCK of Hotspur.

1860 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 25 Apr 1860, Angus McEACHERN of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Crawford Inn at Hotspur. Surities were - Duncan McCALLUM of Ardgarton, Digby and Alfred Von BODEN of Dartmoor.

1860, Mar - POST OFFICE NOTICE. On and after the 23rd March, 1860, a Post office will be opened at Hotspur. Mails will close at this office every Tuesday and Friday, at 5.15 p m. Return mails will be due at Melbourne every Monday and Friday, at 8 a.m. "The Argus"

1861 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 23 Apr 1861, John McCONACHY of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Rising Sun Hotel at Hotspur. Surities were - Thomas Henry CLARKE of Merino and John STOCK of Hotspur.

1861 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 23 Apr 1861, Angus McEACHERN of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Crawford Inn at Hotspur. Surities were - Thomas Henry CLARKE of Merino and John STOCK of Hotspur. On the 11 Sep 1861 the Licence was transferred to David Blair STONE with the surities being Alfred T FARLEY, Digby and Thomas INVERARITY, Digby.

1861, Oct. 28

HOTSPUR.
THE POST OFFICE.--Mr. John Stalk [sic Stock] is the Post Master here. I have not heard of any complaints.
The land around this village is well adapted for agricultural purposes. The crops really look "all there," and there is abundance of the aqueous element. The Portland Road Board are much to their credit, making a first-rate road to Heywood, and I understand many of our friends are taking up occupation licenses on the waste landes of the crown.
THE RISING SUN HOTEL.--I was rather astonished at witnessing so fine a building in this small village as Mr. McConachy has erected. The accommodations are certainly superior and combined with civility and moderate charges, should certainly command that success which enterprise and a well conducted hotel seldom fail to obtain from a discerning public.
THE CRAWFORD INN.--This old established hotel is kept by Mr. Stone, who like our transatlantic cousin Myles, has fornerly rendered himself famous as a well-known whip on this line of road. The hotels at the Smoky river are really commodious and well conduucted.
EDUCATIONAL.--The Presbyterian denominational school here is under the charge of Mr. Thomas Prior. The roll numbers 32. The children are rapidly progressing, and his method of instructing the young ___ is very creditible.
ECCLESIASTICAL.--I regret to learn that no minister has visited this thriving township for some time.
Smoky river, 28th October. "Portland Guardian"

1862 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 30 Apr 1862, David Blair STONE of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Crawford Inn at Hotspur. Surities were - Donald McCALLUM of Digby and Alfred T FARLEY of Digby.

1862 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 30 Apr 1862, Jane McCONACHY of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Rising Sun Hotel at Hotspur after the death of her husband John. Surities were - Thomas Henry CLARKE of Merino and John STOCK of Hotspur.

1862 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 10 Sep 1862, David Blair STONE of Hotspur transferred His Publican's General Licence for the Crawford Inn to Charles WHYTE. Surities were - John HICKS of Merino and James BOXER of Merino.

1862, Aug. - Hotspur bridge is reported to be ten feet under water, and the approaches to the Dartmoor bridge are in a similar state. The flood caused by the swelling of the Glenelg has extended to the Hotel of Mr. Chaffy, at Casterton, and the streets of Saudford are in no better condition. -"Border Watch" (Mount Gambier)

1862, Aug, 25 - Inquest held at Hotspur into the death of Andrew BOURKE who died while talking to David McCONACHY at the "Rising Sun Hotel" on 13 Aug 1862. Inquest conducted by Caleb RADFORD, Coroner. Jurors, listed as men of Hotspur were: John WILLIAMS, George HUNT, Donald NICHOLSON, John SYPOTT, William KAY, Frederick WALKER, Angus McInnes, John KARNES, John STOCK, Charles WHITE, John JEFFRIES, David McCONACHY. Evidence was given by John BOURKE, groom, of Hotspur, son of the deceased Andrew BOURKE, Senior Constable McEVOY of Digby and Henry INVERARITY, Doctor of Digby.

1863 - Hotspur Common School was operating with the teacher being Mr. Thomas PRIOR and at least 70 pupils attending.

1863 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 20 Apr 1863, Jane McCONACHY of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Rising Sun Hotel at Hotspur. Surities were - Duncan McEACHERN of Kangaroo Station and John STOCK of Hotspur.

1863 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 20 Apr 1863, Charles WHYTE of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Crawford Inn at Hotspur. Surities were - Duncan McEACHERN of Kangaroo Station and John SMITH of Hotspur.

1863 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 9 Sep 1863, Jane McCONACHY of Hotspur transferred her her General Publican's Licence for the Rising Sun Hotel at Hotspur to William CHARTER. Surities were - Hugh LEWIS of Digby and Alfred T FARLEY of Digby.

1864 - Memories of a kangaroo hunt on Kangaroo Station near Hotspur in 1864.

I well remember the kangaroo hunt on the Kangaroo Station, some time in 1864, if I remember right. There were about 3000 yarded by horsemen with stockwhips, and when yarded all who could use a stick went into the yard and killed them. An old man called Kangaroo Jack was to have the skins if he wished. I am certain he did not skin them all. The Kangaroo Station at that time was owned by the late Duncan and the late Angus McEachern.

1864 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 27 Apr 1864, Charles WHYTE of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Crawford Inn at Hotspur and the licence was again extended on 29 Jun 1864. Surities were - John HICKS of Merino and Alfred T FARLEY of Digby.

1864 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 27 Apr 1864, William CHARTER of Hotspur applied for and was granted a General Publican's Licence for the Rising Sun Hotel at Hotspur and was again extended on 29 Jun 1864. Surities were - Thomas Henry CLARKE of Digby and Alexander CAMERON of Lower Crawford.

1864, Mar. 28 - William MARSH, sawyer married Catherine FENWICK at the residence of C. WHYTE, Hotspur, Victoria. Charles McBeath WHYTE owned the "Crawford Inn" at Hotspur at this time so that was probably the location of the wedding.

1864, Sep - Proposed School Committees - Hotspur School, No. 810 - John Jeffries, Alexander McDonald. "The Argus"

1864, Oct - Tenders for Mail Services for 1865 - To and from Casterton and Heywood, by way of Sandford, Merino, Digby, and Hotspur, three days a week. "The Argus"

1865 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 31 May 1865, Charles WHYTE of Hotspur applied for and was granted a transfer of his General Publican's Licence for the Crawford Inn at Hotspur to Loughlan McLEAN.

1867 - In the Digby Court of Petty Sessions, 26 Jun 1867, Lachlan McCLEAN of Hotspur applied for and was granted a transfer of his General Publican's Licence for the Crawford Inn at Hotspur to John McEACHERN.

1869 - Thomas Smith SAVIGE took up the position of School Teacher at Hotspur Common School No 310. His brother John SAVIGE had a store in Branxholme.

1869 - Donald MATHESON & Samuel CONDON had sawmill at the Stony Rises, halway between Hotspur and Heywood.

1869, Jan - An inquest was held at Hotspur, on the 22nd Jan 1869, by the district coroner, on the body of a child three months old, the son of Mr. McDonald, a sheepfarmer there. It appeared that the nursemaid, when carrying the child, had fallen, and it was supposed that the child might have been injured then. The jury, however, found that it had died from natural causes. In this case there was little cause for a post-mortem examination, and we agree with the correspondent who sends us these particulars in thinking that it is high time that some measure was adopted which would limit these inquiries to deaths involved in doubt. "The Argus"

1870 - Bailliere's Victorian Gazeteer and Road Guide described Hotspur Parish in 1870 as a "parish and township situated on the Smoky or Upper Crawford River ... There are two hotels ... The population numbers abot 200 persons ..."

Hotspur Iron Bridge (opened 1870) 'Rising Sun' behind 1870's - Opening of the "new" iron bridge at Hotspur. This photograph appears to have been taken just prior to its opening in 1870 from the northern side of the bridge and clearly shows the two story "Rising Sun" Hotel in the background.

1871 - Hotspur Common to be controlled by John MUNRO, John McDONALD, Charles FOSTER & George GRANT as managers.

1871, Dec - A little girl named Catherine Nicholson, was burned to death the other day by a kerosene explosion at Hotspur. The kerosene had not long been in the house (having arrived on a dray from Portland that day) before the children endeavoured to find out bow far the tin was from being full. With that object a sister of the deceased put a lighted match at the spigot. The tin at once exploded, and the girl was enveloped in flames. With great difficulty the fire was extinguished, but the unfortunate child was so awfully burned that she died in a very short time. "The Argus"

1871, Jun 28 - "The Argus" Saturday, 31 Jan 1885 - Edwin HISCOCK and John MEAD to be additional trustees of the land temporarily reserved on 28th June, 1871 as a site for a cemetery at Hotspur.

1872 - The Hotspur Common School No. 310 closed after Thomas Smith SAVIGE resigned from his position as Head Teacher and moved to his land selection closer to Condah.

1875, Nov 8 - Angus McEACHERN 1816-1875, son of Hugh McEACHERN and Mary STEWART died at "Kangaroo" Station. His widow, Ann McDONALD and family emigrated to New Zealand after the death of Angus.

1880 - Donald MATHESON & Samuel CONDON moved their sawmill from the Stony Rises, to Wheeler's Swamp, Hotspur.

1882 - Donald MATHESON & wife Flora (McEACHERN) purchased the "Rising Sun Hotel" at Hotspur.

1883, Jan 20 - "The Argus" Thursday, 20 Jan 1883 - Portland, Friday (from our own correspondent by telegraph) - "Captain" Ward, the swindler, who attempted to escape to South Australia, was caught at 3 o'clock this morning at Hotspur, and is now on his way back to town under the care of Constable Hanlon, of Heywood. There was no chance for the man to escape, as Segeant Elliott, of Portland, had made a cordon round him of 60 miles. The carriage and horces have also been recovered. The wind is strong from the S.E., and the weather most delightful.

1885, Jan 31 - "The Argus" Saturday, 31 Jan 1885 - Edwin HISCOCK and John MEAD to be additional trustees of the land temporarily reserved on 28th June, 1871 as a site for a cemetery at Hotspur.

1885, May 2 - "The Argus" Saturday, 2 May 1885 - James Blackwood, sen., Henry Hiscock, and John Lowrie, appointed as managers of the Hotspur town common.

1886 - Donald MATHESON & wife Flora (McEACHERN) sold the "Rising Sun Hotel" at Hotspur to Robert MILLER, chemist of Casterton.

1886, Jan 4 - "The Argus" Monday, 4 Jan 1886 - Our Hotspur correspondent writes - Mr John Outtram, farmer, aged 70 years died suddenly of sunstroke on December 31. The deceased was much respected in the district, where he had resided for more than 33 years.

1887, Nov 23 - Coleraine, Tuesday. Last night the body of a man was found in the River Wannon, near Turnbull's station. Sergeant McGANN and two constables went from Coleraine to the spot. As there was no other way of getting the body from the middle of the river, the sergeant swam in and brought the body ashore with the aid of a rope. The deceased is believed to be a man named McRAE who had been missing from Hotspur for the past fortnight. "The Argus"

1888, Jan 19 - "The Argus" Thursday, 19 Jan 1888 - Heywood, Wednesday - Donald Smith, a boy aged six years, fell into the Crawford River at Hotspur on Tuesday evening, and was drowned. Two boys named Henry Munro, aged 11 years, and William Gough, aged 12 years dived into the water, and recovered the body of deceased. It is considered that their plucky conduct should receive some recognition.

1888, Mar 9 - "The Argus" Friday, 9 Mar 1888 - Portland, Thursday - A very old resident at Heywood, named Thomas BROOKS, died to day from injuries received through being thrown out of a conveyance. The deceased, who had been to Hotspur with a coffin for a man who had died there, was returning home to Heywood, when he was thrown and fractured his skull.

1888, Nov 21 - THE SHEARING CAMPAIGN. Our Hotspur correspondent writes - Shearing commenced at Kangaroo Station on the l3th instant. Mr Weatherly, lessee of the run, was annoyed last season by the interfernce of the union agents and and his men were taken from him three times. This year he appealed to the district superintendent of police for protection, and Constable McLoughlin, of Portland, was ordered to proceeed to Kangaroo Station and remain there while shearing lasted. A full board of non union men is at work and the hut is guarded at night by an armed patrol. During the week several union men visited the place and tried to draw the shearers from their work. The constable in charge warned them that if they resorted to violence he would use drastic measures with them. After some parleying they struck their tents and moved away quietly to their old camp. This retreat was rather surprising, as Kangaroo Station was one of four marked out for special treatment this season. Mr Weatherly says that as his men, who are old servants, have been brought to the station under an armed escort, he will allow no man to mollest them while they are in his employ. It is only fair to the leaders of the union in this part of the country to state that they have urged their scouts never to be violent or abusive. Bassett, Upper Craword, and Rifle Downs have shorn under non-union agreements. Year after year the land is getting cleared of timber through ringing and bush fires. A fair rainfall has given an abundance of feed, so that the country near the Crawford River is yielding larger returns than it has ever done. On one station that formerly ran 10,000 sheep more than l9,00O sheep and lambs have been brought to the board this year. "The Argus"

1890, Jun 3 - VICTORIAN MALE ASSISTANT TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION - A committee meeting of the Victorian Male Assistant Teachers' Association was held at the Public Service rooms, Athenaeum, on Saturday last, Mr. H. Crockett, vice-president, in the chair...
... Messrs. W. Carrol, head teacher, Henty; J. May, head teacher, Darlingford, and Geo. Gray, head teacher, Hotspur, were Provisionally elected members, and the meeting closed.

1892 - Hotspur Mechanics Institute was planned in 1892 with the initial committee being - H. HISCOCK, J. MUNRO, C. SYPOTT, Mr SEDGWICK, R, MEADE, A. KING, J. SMITH, T. J. GLEESON (sec).

1893 - W. KING appointed Librarian and Caretaker of the Hotspur Mechanics Institute. Subscriptions were Gentlemen 2/- per quater, ladies 1/-, Children 6d, librarian's salary was 1 pound per quarter.

Iron Bridge, Hotspur, Victoria, opened 1870 1902 - Hotspur Mechanics Institute committee - W. MUNRO, J. GLEESON, J. McDONALD, H. SMITH, A. KING, F. FIDLER, J. KING, A. McDONALD, L. MUNRO, G. BRINDLEY, A. J. DUNKIN.

1906, Oct 29 - "The Argus" Monday, 29 Oct 1906 - SNAKE BITE - MERINO, Friday - A lad named WELLAN, about 13 years of age, was bitten by a snake yesterday evening at Hotspur. The boy untied his boot-lace and bound it tightly around his wound, afterwards making incisions in the finger with his pocket knife. Upon arrival at Merino he received medical treatment and is now out of danger.

1906, Nov 15 - "The Argus" Thursday, 15 Nov 1906 - DOG GOES FISHING.
PORTAND Friday - A black and tan smooth-haired terrier, belonging to a young man named GLEESON of Hotspur, distinguished itself yesterday. In company with other lads, GLEESON was angllng for perch in the Crawford River when his bamboo rod was pulled into the water by a fish that had been hooked. The river at the spot is 30 or 40 yards wide and about 12ft deep The perch darted across to the other side taking the rod with it and the terrier was sent to recover it. When the dog reached the rod it attempted to bring it back, but the struggles of the large fish prevented this. The dog however touched ground on the opposite side, and hauled out rod, line and fish to land. The dog was then told to bring the rod across, but the fish became unhooked on the bank. The terrier immediately caught it bv the head jumped into the stream, and swan across, bringing the fish to his master.

1907, Jul 18 - "The Argus" Thursday, 18 Jul 1907 - DEATH AT TEA - CONDAH, Tuesday. - An elderly resident of Hotspur, John KEYS, a bachelor, was found dead on Sundaay morning, when a neighbour visited his residence about 10 o'clock, and discovered his lifeless body on the floor. It is surmised that he was haviug his tea on Saturday evening when he suddenly collapsed. At the inquest held by Mr. C. BRYCE, J.P., a verdict of death from heart failure was returned.

1911, Oct 20 - "The Argus" Friday, 20 Oct 1911 - INDIAN HAWKERS DEATH - MERINO - Thursday. The body of an Indian hawker named Kishn SINGH was found at Hotspur on the Crawford River on Wednesday. It was brought to Merino. An inquiry will be held. 1913, Nov 26 - Duncan McEACHERN (known as "Little Duncan") died at Hotspur and was buried in the Hotspur Cemetery. Duncan was a veteran of both the Crimean War and the American Civil War.

1915, Nov 6 - "The Argus" Saturday, 6 Nov 1915 - DEAD IN CAR - STATION OWNER'S FATE.
PORTLAND, Friday. - A telephone message from Hotspur states that Mr. A. A. McEACHERN, owner of Lower Crawford Station, was found dead in his motor-car in the scrub some distance off the road. He left home on the previous day. Death is supposed to have been due to heart disease.

World War 1
The effect on the Hotspur community, like communities all over the country, of World War 1 was very significant with the loss of many local men.

1915, Apr 14 - Clarence Vale WELLNER, 22nd Battalion AIF, born 1894 Hotspur, son of Mary Margaret WELLNER, died from measles at Broadmeadows, Vic. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1916, Nov 26 - William OUTTRAM, 58th Battalion AIF, son of John OUTTRAM and Jessie McPHEE, born 1883, Digby, died of wounds, WW1, France. William was the husband of Ada Florence Susan SIMKIN of Digby. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1916, Dec 21 - Hector McDONALD, 59th Battalion AIF, born 1890 Hotspur, son of Angus McDONALD and Margaret McGUINESS, killed in action, WW1, France. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, Feb 8 - James McPherson SMITH, 6th Battalion AIF, born Hotspur 1893, son of John SMITH and Catherine McINNES, died of wounds, WW1, France. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, May 9 - Christopher Wilson CARTER, 6th Battalion AIF, born 1887 Tahara, Vic, son of Christopher Wilson CARTER and Marjory AITCHESON was killed in action, WW1, France. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, Jul 17 - Henry George SYPOTT, 38th Battalion AIF, born 1896 Gymbowen, Vic., son of John Bernard SYPOTT from Hotspur, and Sarah Jane REDFORD, died of wounds, WW1, Belgium. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, Oct 4 - William Thomas BLACKWOOD, 6th Battalion AIF, born 1893 Hotspur, son of Robert BLACKWOOD and Agnes WILSON, killed in action, WW1, Belgium. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, Oct 4 - Albert Henry KING, 5th Battalion AIF, born 1895 Hotspur, son of William Henry KING and Mary Ann McLEAN, died of wounds, WW1, Belgium. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, Oct 12 - Hugh McDermott "Mac" BRINDLEY, 37th Battalion AIF, born 1891 Hotspur, son of John Herbert BRINDLEY and Sarah Catherine McDERMOTT, killed in action, WW1, Belgium. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, Oct 13 - Hector McDONALD, 38th Battalion AIF, born 1891 Hotspur, son of John McDONALD and Isabella McGUINESS, killed in action, WW1, Belgium. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1917, Oct 26 - Leslie TRELOAR, 8th Battalion AIF, born 1889 Hotspur, son of Walter Thomas TRELOAR and Emily KING, killed in action, WW1, Belgium. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1918, May 6 - Charles Hotspur MUNRO, 1st Battalion, Wellington Regiment NZEF, born 1874 Hotspur, son of John MUNRO and Bridget LEONARD, died, WW1, Calais, France. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1918, June, 2nd - World War 1 Avenue of Honour commemoration. A ceremony commemorating the planting of the 40 Kurrajong trees honouring the 40 soldiers from district who enlisted in World War 1, many of whom did not return.

1918, Jul 7 - John Frederick OUTTRAM, 58th Battalion AIF, born 1896 Hotspur, son of Jeremiah OUTTRAM and Emily Louisa ULLITHORN, died WW1, France. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1918, Sep 24 - John Herbert "Jack" BRINDLEY, 4th Division Ammunition Column AIF, born 1889 Hotspur, son of John Herbert BRINDLEY and Sarah Catherine McDERMOTT, killed in action, WW1, France. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

1918, Oct 18 - Duncan SMITH, 4th Light Horse Regiment AIF, born 1878 Hotspur, son of John SMITH and Catherine McINNES. Duncan was a member of the famous Light Horse Charge at Beersheba, Palestine in 1917 but died from pneumonia in Damascus, Syria. Tree in Hotspur Avenue of Honour.

2001, June - World War 1 Avenue of Honour restoration. A ceremony commemorating the restoration of the 40 Kurrajong trees honouring the 40 soldiers from district who enlisted in World War 1. A new brass plaque with the names of these local soldiers was mounted on a large rock and unveiled by Elsie BROWN (nee HISCOCK) as part of this ceremony.

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